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IdealShape Reviews: Is IdealShake Better than Shakeology & Isagenix?

Expert opinion:

Not Recommended

IdealShape

IdealShape was founded in 2003 as a family run, Utah based company, specializing in long-term weight management.1 Since its launch, the company has expanded to include several products, such as their total weight loss plans, IdealShape meal replacement snack bars, IdealShape shakes, weight loss drinks, and supplements.

IdealShape claims that their shakes satisfy cravings, curb hunger for up to 3 hours following use, and taste great. One of the ways IdealShape markets their shakes is by suggesting that users won’t feel like they need to cheat on a diet, because IdealShakes taste like dessert.3

Throughout this unbiased IdealShape review, we will take a closer look at what makes the IdealShape brand unique, and whether the science behind IdealShape products is sound.

IdealShake

The IdealShake is a staple product in the IdealShape brand, containing whey protein. The shakes are available in 16 flavors, including 2 superfood flavors which are sweetened with Stevia.2,3 IdealShake flavors include:

  • Harvest pumpkin spice
  • Vanilla chai
  • Cinnamon bun
  • Mocha
  • Orange cream
  • Strawberry
  • Salted caramel
  • Chocolate cream pie
  • Key lime
  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla
  • Chocolate peanut butter
  • Cookies n’ cream
  • Mint chocolate chip
  • Superfood vanilla with Stevia
  • Superfood chocolate with Stevia

The IdealShake is intended to act as a replacement for 1-2 meals daily, and is reported by IdealShape to block hunger. The shakes are described as providing an all-whey protein base, along with 20-21 essential vitamins and minerals, and 5g of dietary fiber per 29g scoop.3 They are designed to build lean muscle while reducing sugar cravings in users.

IdealShape reviews and where to buy idealshake
Idealshape ingredients and does IdealShape work

With over 15 vitamins and minerals, IdealShake helps users reduce nutritional deficiencies and provides over 20% of the recommended daily protein and fiber intake.

IdealShape Ingredients

According to the IdealShape nutrition label, the chocolate IdealShake mix contains an IdealShape protein blend, a digestive enzyme blend, and an IdealShape hunger blocker blend, as well as a long list of vitamins and nutrients. While the label doesn’t list measurements for each ingredient, it does recommend a 29g scoop of mix per serving. The list of ingredients for the chocolate flavor is very similar to those listed in other flavors.

Whey Protein Concentrate – Whey protein is found in dairy ingredients and its concentrated version removes many of the liquids and is favored among athletes for its potential to build and maintain muscle tissues.4

Whey protein isolates generally contain at least 90% protein concentration.4

Whey Protein Isolate – Isolates are the purest of all three forms of whey protein, and involves the removal of lactose and fat.4 Whey protein has been shown to increase muscle protein synthesis during resistance training in athletes.11

The hunger blocker blend includes:

Isomalto-oligosaccharide – A prebiotic plant fiber, isomalto-oligosaccharide is found in fermented foods like miso. They have been proven to delay and supress feelings of hunger.6

Potato Protein Extract – Potato protein extract encourages the production of a peptide hormone called cholecystokinin (CCK). CCK is known to decrease hunger and promote sensations of fullness.7

The Idealshape digestive enzyme blend includes:

Bromelain –Bromelain is an enzyme that helps break down proteins. Some studies suggest bromelain may also have natural anti-obesity properties.8

Papain – An enzyme found in papaya, papain also helps break down protein during the digestive process.12 Anecdotal evidence which supports the use of papain as a natural ingredient for weight loss.

DigeSEB – DigeSEB is a product created using a proprietary blend of papain, bromelain and peptizyme SP, which are all enzymes used to break down protein.

Lactase – Produced naturally in the body, lactase is an enzyme used specifically in the digestion of dairy products. Dairy has demonstrated weight loss in women, and lactase helps break it down during digestion.9

Idealshake ingredients also include:

Vitamin A – Vitamin A helps regulate the immune system, and the growth of cells in the body.26

Calcium – Calcium is a natural mineral found in dairy-based foods. It plays a role in the strengthening and maintenance of bone health.14

Vitamin D – Vitamin D helps the body absorb and use calcium. It is beneficial to the skin and bones, and is obtained through sun exposure or supplementation.21

Thiamine – Thiamine is also known as vitamin B1, and helps the body modify food into energy. It also helps metabolize fats and proteins, and has been shown to strengthen the immune system.19

Niacin – Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, helps in several areas of the body, including the nervous system, liver, eyes, and skin. It also aids in the conversion of food to fuel, and improves circulation.25

Folate – As with other B-vitamins, folate (also known as folic acid) helps the body transform food into energy.16

Biotin – Recognized as a B vitamin, biotin helps metabolize carbohydrates and fat into protein. Supplements often include biotin for good hair and nail health.28

Phosphorus– In the body, phosphorus assists in ATP (energy) production, muscle contractions, and is needed for protein formation.32

Magnesium – Magnesium aids in protein synthesis, cell signaling, as well as energy production.31

Chloride – A component of salt, chloride helps balance fluids in the body and is important for digestive juices found in the stomach.33

Vitamin C – Essential for the immune system and tissue repair in the body, vitamin C is found naturally in a variety of fruit and vegetables.30

Iron – Iron is a mineral that helps oxygen travel via red blood cells through your body. It also aids in the formation of hemoglobin, which assists with muscle contraction.23

Vitamin E also helps in the production of red blood cells, and digestion in those with gastrointestinal disorders.29

Vitamin E – Vitamin E has strong antioxidant properties which help protect the body from free radicals.29

Riboflavin – Vitamin B2, or riboflavin, is used by the human body to metabolize protein and fat. It has been shown to improve skin, hair, liver, and eye health, and has antioxidant properties.18

Vitamin B6 – Vitamin B6, or pyridoxine, is a B-vitamin and helps metabolize protein and fats, providing the body with energy by transforming food in to fuel.20

Potassium – Potassium is a critical mineral, which helps in the maintenance of heart health.27

Vitamin B12 – Also known as cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12 is essential for producing energy, and helping the body properly use fats and proteins.17

Pantothenic Acid – Vitamin B5, or pantothenic acid, helps your body break down carbohydrates and use them as energy. It also helps in the production of red blood cells, sex hormones, and improves digestion.24

Iodine – A natural mineral found in foods, iodide is important to thyroid health. This is beneficial as a workout and health aid because the hormone secreted by the thyroid regulates protein synthesis and other important physiological changes.15

Zinc – Zinc is a mineral that helps in several areas of the body including the immune system, thyroid, growth, and blood clotting.22

For a closer look at the nutritional value in all IdealShake flavors, here is a breakdown of calories, fat, protein, and sugars:

  • Harvest pumpkin spice: 110 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2.5g fat.
  • Vanilla chai: 100 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2.5g fat.
  • Cinnamon bun: 110 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2.5g fat.
  • Mocha: 100 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2g fat.
  • Orange cream: 100 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2g fat.
  • Strawberry: 100 calories, 11g protein, 2g sugar, and 3g fat
  • Salted caramel: 100 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2g fat.
  • Chocolate cream pie: 100 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2.5g fat.
  • Key lime: 100 calories, 12g protein, 2g sugar, and 3g fat.
  • Chocolate: 100 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2.5g fat.
  • Vanilla: 100 calories, 11g protein, 1g sugar, and 2.5g fat.
  • Chocolate peanut butter: 110 calories, 11g protein, 2g sugar, and 2.5g fat
  • Cookies n’ cream: 110 calories, 11g protein, 2g sugar, and 2.5g fat
  • Mint chocolate chip: 100 calories, 11g protein, 2g sugar, and 2g fat.
  • Superfood vanilla with Stevia: 110 calories, 12g protein, 1g sugar, and 3g fat.
  • Superfood chocolate with Stevia: 100 calories, 12g protein, 1g sugar, and 3g fat.

IdealShape Reviews and Results

While there are no human studies published on the weight management effects of the Idealshape shake, idealshape reviews provide both negative and positive results during personal use. Idealshape is marketed for both men and women, although most of the success stories on the company website are submitted by women. Many of the reviews on Idealshape offer before and after photos, some of which boast significant results.

So, does idealshape work? Without individual measurements for ingredients, it’s difficult to determine whether dose dependence could be a defining factor in the success of Idealshakes. Ingredients, such as whey powder and Isomalto-oligosaccharide have shown success in animal and human studies as appetite suppressants and lean muscle tissue builders, lending scientific foundation to the Idealshape product claims.

In a 2010 human study, researchers found that consuming whey protein before a meal had the useful effect of appetite suppression in subjects. It also lowered blood glucose following the meal.5 An animal study published in 2006 found that feeding oligosaccharides to subjects increased food satiety and reduced hunger, making this ingredient a potential supplement for use in cases of obesity and weight loss.6 In a 2011 publication, researchers reported that diets high in dairy protein increased positive body changes in women, such as fat loss and lean muscle gain.9

Where Can You Buy IdealShape

Now that you know how IdealShake works, you might be wondering where to buy IdealShape products. Currently, IdealShape is offered exclusively through online retailers in Canada and the U.S.A. While there are a variety of online sources to buy through, GNC doesn’t yet carry IdealShape products.

You can purchase a 30-serving container of IdealShape shake for anywhere from $19.99 USD to $59.99USD depending on the website. IdealShape also offers bulk packages with 4 tubs of shake mix, an e-book and a shaker bottle for $124.99USD-$154.99USD.

IdealShape vs Shakeology

When choosing a protein shake, it’s a good idea to compare your favorite to competitors on the market. The IdealShape website does some of this legwork for you, comparing IdealShape with Shakeology. Shakeology offers the same money back guarantee and balanced nutrition for weight loss, but lacks the Slendesta hunger blocker, and costs more per meal.2

Shakeology has fewer flavors, and uses whey and pea protein in their mix, while IdealShake uses two types of whey protein. Shakeology also has 9g of sugar, while IdealShake only has 1g-2g of sugar per serving.2

IdealShape vs Isagenix

When comparing IdealShape to Isagenix, you again see a difference in flavor selection, with Isagenix offering only 10 variations of chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry, with the addition of seasonal flavors throughout the year.10

Like IdealShake, Isagenix uses a mix of two whey proteins, and a mix of more than 20 vitamins and minerals. Isagenix has a higher dose of protein per serving, providing users with 24g instead of the 11-12g in Idealshape.10 Many users speak highly of the Isagenix brand, but like IdealShape and Shakeology, there are both positive and negative reviews.

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Scientific Research Referenced in this Article

  1. Sadeghi, N. (2010). Press release: Growing Utah-based weight loss company welcomes established entrepreneur as its new ceo. Idealshape. Retrieved on October 26, 2017 from – View Reference
  2. Idealshape. (2017). All meal replacement shakes. Idealshape. Retrieved on October 26, 2017 from – View Reference
  3. Idealshape. (2017) The ultimate meal replacement shake for weight loss. Idealshape. Retrieved on October 26, 2017 from – View Reference
  4. Hoffman, J.R. & Falvo, M. J. (2004) Protein – which is best? Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 3(3), 118-130. Retrieved on October 26, 2017 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3905294/
  5. Akhavan, T., Luhovyy, B. L., Brown, P. H., Cho, C. E. & Anderson G. H. (2010) Effect of premeal consumption of whey protein and its hydrolysate on food intake and postmeal glycemia and insulin responses in young adults. American Society for Nutrition. 91(4), 966-975. Retrieved on October 26, 2017 from http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/91/4/966.short
  6. Cani, P.D., Horsmans, Y. & Delzenne, N. M. (2006) Oligofructose promotes satiety in healthy human: a pilot study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 60(5), 567-572. Retrieved on October 26, 2027 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16340949
  7. Morganti, P. (2007) Where nutriceuticals meet cosmeceuticals. Journal of Applied Cosmetology. Retrieved on October 26, 2017 from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pierfrancesco_Morganti/publication/235952513_Where_nutriceuticals_meet_cosmeceuticals/links/00b49514b0d7cedbc9000000.pdf
  8. Sandeep, D., Kaur, N. J., Nanduri, R., Dkhar, H. K., Kumar, A. & Gupta, P. (2012) Inhibition of adipogenesis and induction of apoptosis and lipolysis by stem bromelain in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030831
  9. Josse, A. R., Atkinson, S. A., Tarnopolsky, M. A. & Phillips, S. M. (2011) Increased consumption of dairy foods during diet and exercise-induced weight loss promotes fat loss and lean muscle gain in overweight and obese premenopausal women. American Society for Nutrition. 141(9), 1626-1634. Retrieved on October 26, 2017 from http://jn.nutrition.org/content/141/9/1626.short
  10. Isalean shake. Isagenix. Retrieved on October 26, 2-17 from
  11. Tang, J. E., Manolakos, J. J., Kujbida, G. W., Lysecki, P. J., Moore, D. R. & Philips, S. M. (2007) Minimal whey protein with carbohydrate stimulates muscle protein synthesis following resistance exercise in trained young men. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism. 32(6), 1132-1138. Retrieved on October 27, 207 from http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/H07-076#.WfN8yWhSzIU
  12. Mandel, L. B. & Blood, A. F. (1910) Some peculiarities of the proteolytic activity of papain. Journal of Biological Chemistry. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.jbc.org/content/8/3/177.short
  13. S. National Library of Medicine: Medline Plus. (2017, January 7). Chloride in diet. Retrieved October 31, 2017 from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002417.htm
  14. Tenforde, A. S., Sayres, L. C., Sainani, K. L. & Fredericson, M. (2010) Evaluating the relationship of calcium and vitamin D in the prevention of stress fracture injuries in the young athlete: A review of the literature. PM & R. 2(10), 945-949. DOI: 1016/j.pmrj.2010.05.006
  15. S. Depatment of Health & Human Services. (2011) Iodine. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-HealthProfessional/
  16. Ehrlich, S. (2015) Vitamin b9 (folic acid) Unviersity of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b9-folic-acid
  17. Ehrlich, S. (2015) Vitamin b12 (cobalamin) Unviersity of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b12-cobalamin
  18. Ehrlich, S. (2015) Vitamin b2 (riboflavin) Unviersity of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b2-riboflavin
  19. Ehrlich, S. (2015) Vitamin b1 (thiamine) Unviersity of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b1-thiamine
  20. Ehrlich, S. (2015) Vitamin b6 (pyridoxine). University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b6-pyridoxine
  21. University of Michigan. (2017) Cholecalciferol (vitamin d3). Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d03129a1
  22. Ehrlich, S. (2013) Zinc. University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/zinc
  23. Poulson, B. & Wilkins, J. Iron. University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=19&contentid=iron
  24. Ehrlich, S. (2013) Vitamin b5 (pantothenic acid). University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b5-pantothenic-acid
  25. Ehrlich, S. (2015) Vitamin b3 (niacin). University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-b3-niacin
  26. Higdon, J., Drake, V. J. & Delage, V. (2003-2015) Vitamin a. Oregon State University. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/vitamin-A
  27. University of Michigan. (2017) Potassium chloride. Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d00345a1
  28. Ehrlich, S. (2013) Vitamin e (biotin). University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-h-biotin
  29. Ehrlich, S. (2016) Vitamin e. University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-e
  30. Ehrlich, S. (2013) Vitamin c (ascorbic acid). University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/vitamin-c-ascorbic-acid
  31. Higdon, J., Drake, V. J. & Delage, V. (2001-2013) Magnesium. Oregon State University. Retrieved on October 27, 2017 from http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/magnesium
  32. S. National Library of Medicine: Medline Plus. (2017, January 7). Phosphorus in diet. Retrieved October 31, 2017 from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002424.htm

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